Health insurance abroad

Almost everyone living and/or working in the Netherlands is insured under the acts 'Wet langdurige zorg (Wlz)' and 'Zorgverzekeringswet (Zvw)' to cover the costs of healthcare. That remains the case if they travel abroad on holiday. If you live, work or study abroad, your personal situation determines whether you are still insured in the Netherlands. You will find further information below.

Latest news

The United Kingdom officially left the European Union (EU) on 31 January 2020. This is called the Brexit. A transitional period will apply until 1 January 2021 during which the United Kingdom still abides by all EU laws and agreements.

Read more on what changes from January 2021

All information on our website about health insurance abroad is now also available in English. To switch from Dutch to English, click on the ‘English’ button at the top right of a web page. When using a mobile device you will find the button under ‘menu’. The language switch is only available for the web pages of the Health Insurance Abroad scheme.

Pensioners who emigrate to or live in a treaty country

If you no longer live or work in the Netherlands, you can no longer have Dutch health insurance. Before you move you need to take the following steps:

  • Check whether you are receiving a Dutch statutory pension or benefit. You can verify this on our Pension and benefits page.
  • Check whether you are moving to a treaty country.
  • Ideally, inform your health insurer of your moving date 2 months before you leave. The organisation that pays your pension or benefit should also be informed as soon as possible that you are emigrating. You have to wait until shortly before your departure to notify the municipality from which you are moving. This can be done from 5 days before you relocate.

Read more about health insurance and moving abroad

The Netherlands has various treaties with other countries. However, we only have agreements with the following countries relating to medical care in the event of emigration:

  • EU countries
  • EEA countries
  • treaty countries outside the EU/EEA

We refer to these countries as ‘treaty countries’.

Read on for an overview of the treaty countries

If you emigrate, your Dutch health insurance expires. Are you still receiving a statutory pension or benefit from the Netherlands and are you moving to or do you live in a treaty country? In that case you are entitled to medical care in your new country of residence. That is why you need to register with us.

Read more on moving abroad and your health insurance

Complete the S1/121 application form (7.12.2020, PDF, 758 kB) and send it to us. If you are entitled to medical care in your country of residence, we will register you as a treaty-entitled person. We will then send you the S1/E121, which you can use to register with a local health insurance fund.

You will only receive an S1/E121 if:

  • You are receiving a Dutch statutory pension or benefit.
  • You live in a treaty country.

That depends on their situation:

  • Are they receiving a pension or benefit themselves? If so, they also have to apply for the S1/E121 using the S1/121 application form (7.12.2020, PDF, 758 kB).
  • Are they not receiving a pension or benefit themselves? In that case enter their names on your application form. These family members are not automatically entitled to medical care in your country of residence. However, it may be possible to include them under your policy. This will be determined by the health insurance fund in your country of residence.
  • Do your family members still work in the Netherlands? If so, compulsory health insurance continues to apply and they must retain their Dutch health insurance. They will need an S1/E106 to register with a health insurance fund in your country of residence. They can apply for this from their Dutch health insurer.

In most countries you register with the health insurance fund in your place or country of residence. The leaflet accompanying the S1/E121 tells you which body you need to contact. It is a good idea to obtain some information from that body first. They can tell you whether you need any additional documents. There may also be certain arrangements to make before you can register with a health insurance fund. In Sweden, for example, you must already be in possession of a tax number, so you need to apply for that in advance.

Once you have registered with the health insurance fund, we will receive confirmation of this.

Read more about getting medical care abroad

Do you live in a treaty country? If so, you are entitled to medical care in accordance with the laws of that country if you have an S1/E121. You can find out which treatments and medicines will be refunded from the health insurance fund you register with. Any costs you incur in your country of residence must be claimed from your health insurance fund in that country. You cannot claim those costs from us.

Do you live in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland? If so, you are entitled to medical care in the Netherlands. This concerns care that forms part of the Dutch basic package. You can show the care provider the EHIC that you received from us. Do you not yet have an EHIC? Apply for an EHIC online.

Do you want more information?

You can find out more at I want to go to the Netherlands for medical treatment

Or visit the website of the Zilveren Kruis to see what care is refunded and what steps you need to take

When am I not entitled to care in the Netherlands?

Do you not live in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland? In that case you are not entitled to an EHIC. That means you cannot use an EHIC to receive medical care in the Netherlands. You will need to take out extra insurance or travel insurance to cover medical costs incurred during your stay in the Netherlands.

The EHIC entitles you to necessary medical care in EU/EEA countries and Switzerland. You cannot use the EHIC in your country of residence.

Do you live in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland? Apply for an EHIC

Read more about medical care in another EU country

If you do not live in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland, you are not entitled to an EHIC. To cover any medical costs incurred while you are staying in these countries, it makes sense to take out extra insurance or travel insurance.

You pay a healthcare contribution to the CAK. This contribution comprises:

  1. The fixed contribution under the Healthcare Insurance Act (Zvw). This contribution is determined annually by the Minister for Health, Welfare and Sport.
  2. Income-dependent contributions. The percentages for these correspond to what you would have to pay on your income in the Netherlands. You pay these contributions on the income you receive from the Netherlands and any income from another country.

Read more about the cost of your contribution

One of your Dutch pension funds or benefits agencies will deduct the fixed contribution every month for you and any family members aged 18 and above who are included under your policy.

All your pension funds or benefits agencies will also deduct the income-dependent contributions from your pension or benefit.

Do you need to pay a healthcare contribution to us? If so, we will ask the Employee Insurance Agency (UWV) whether you are receiving an income from a Dutch employer or organisation. UWV keeps a central record of everyone with an income. An income can take the form of a salary, pension or benefit.

Once we know who you are receiving an income from, we will ask your pension fund (or benefits agency) to deduct the contribution from your income. Your pension fund (or benefits agency) will then transfer your healthcare contribution to us.

You will receive an annual statement from us. We will send this out after the end of the calendar year. This annual statement will include a summary of the contribution due from you and of the amounts you have paid.

  • Have you overpaid? If so, you will receive a refund.
  • Have you underpaid? In that case you will have to make an additional payment.

We also apply tax credits in the annual statement.

For more information please see Financial information for treaty-entitled persons.

A healthcare benefit is a contribution towards the costs of your health care insurance. Whether you receive a healthcare benefit depends on your and your partner’s income. You apply for a healthcare benefit to the Tax and Customs Administration in the Netherlands. They will also take the country of residence factor into account. If you live in a country with a low country of residence factor, you will probably not be entitled to a healthcare benefit.

See the Tax and Customs Administration website (Belastingdienst.nl) for the conditions and more information.

NB: Co-insured children aged 18 and above can apply for a healthcare benefit independently. In such a case, only the income that they earn themselves is counted.

You will receive an annual statement from us in which you will see the final amount of your healthcare contribution. We will send out this annual statement after the end of each calendar year. You will usually receive it in the second half of the following year.

Visit Netherlandsworldwide.nl and see what you need to think about in addition to health insurance if you are going to live, work or travel abroad.

Working in the Netherlands and living abroad

If you work in the Netherlands, you have to take out health insurance with a Dutch health insurer. You can decide on a health insurer of your choice. All health insurers are obliged to accept you for basic insurance cover.

NB: Do you work in the Netherlands and also in your country of residence? In that case ask the Sociale Verzekerings Bank (SVB) in which country you need to take out insurance.

If your family members no longer live or work in the Netherlands, they can no longer have Dutch health insurance. In some cases they can be co-insured under your policy in their country of residence. That is only possible, however, if they live in a treaty country.

Read more about getting medical care in your country of residence

The Netherlands has various treaties with other countries. However, we only have agreements with the following countries relating to medical care in the event of emigration:

  • EU countries
  • EEA countries
  • treaty countries outside the EU/EEA

We refer to these countries as ‘treaty countries’.

Read on for an overview of the treaty countries

If your family members no longer live or work in the Netherlands, they can no longer have Dutch health insurance. In some cases they can be insured under your policy in their country of residence. That is only possible, however, if they live in a treaty country.

Read more about medical care for your family members abroad

Do your family members live in a treaty country and are they registered with a health insurance fund there? If so, they can ask that fund about the treatments and medicines that can be refunded.

Your family members do not have Dutch health insurance. This means that any healthcare costs they incur in their country of residence can only be claimed from the health insurance fund in that country. You cannot claim those costs from us.

Read more about living in a treaty country yourself

Do your family members live in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland? If so, they are entitled to medical care in the Netherlands. This concerns care that forms part of the Dutch basic package. They can present their European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) to the doctor or hospital. Do they not yet have an EHIC? In that case they can apply for an EHIC online.

Read more about family treatment in the Netherlands

Do your family members not live in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland? In that case they are not entitled to an EHIC. That means they cannot use an EHIC to receive medical care in the Netherlands. You will need to take out extra insurance or travel insurance to cover medical costs incurred during their stay in the Netherlands.

The European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) entitles your family members to necessary medical care in EU/EEA countries and Switzerland, if they are there on holiday for example. If your family members live in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland, they can apply to us for an EHIC online. They cannot use the EHIC in their country of residence.

Read more on medical care for family members in other EU countries

Do your family members not live in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland? In that case they are not entitled to a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). To cover any medical costs incurred while you are staying in those countries, you need to take out extra insurance or travel insurance.

NB: You can obtain an EHIC yourself from your health insurer, as you have Dutch health insurance. With this EHIC you are entitled to medical care in other EU countries.

For family members aged 18 and above you pay a healthcare contribution to the CAK. This is a fixed contribution under the Healthcare Insurance Act (Zvw). This contribution is determined annually by the Minister for Health, Welfare and Sport.

The healthcare contribution is adjusted using the ‘country of residence factor’, as the costs of medical care differ from one country to another. What you ultimately pay therefore depends on the country you live in.

Read more on costs of medical care for family members

We send you an invoice at the beginning of each year. If your family members are included under your policy in the course of a year, you will receive an invoice as soon as we have registered your family members.

The invoice will indicate the names of your family members and the healthcare contribution you have to pay for them. The annual amount is spread over the remaining months of the year. That means you pay the contribution to us in instalments.

Read more about paying the contribution for family members

You will receive an annual statement from us within 3 months of the end of a calendar year. That means you will receive it by 1 April at the latest. This annual statement will include a summary of the healthcare contribution you have paid and of the amounts still due from you.

  • Have you overpaid? If so, you will receive a refund.
  • Have you underpaid? In that case you will have to make an additional payment.

Yes, you can. If you have received an annual statement from us and have to make an additional payment, you can apply for an arrangement with us for the settlement of this sum.

A healthcare benefit is a contribution towards the costs of your Dutch health insurance. Whether you receive a healthcare benefit depends on your and your partner’s income. You may also be able to receive a healthcare benefit for your partner if your partner is included under your policy and is registered with us.

Your co-insured children aged 18 and above can apply for a healthcare benefit independently. In such a case, only the income that they earn themselves is counted. See the Tax and Customs Administration (Belastingdienst.nl) website for the conditions and more information.

Visit Netherlandsworldwide.nl and see what you need to think about in addition to health insurance if you are going to live, work or travel abroad.

Pensions and benefits that entitle you to an S1/121

You are receiving a statutory pension or benefit if you are being paid one of the following pensions or benefits:

Read more about statutionary pensions and benefits

If you are only receiving a surviving dependant’s benefit from a pension fund (such as ABP), you are not entitled to an S1/121 from the Netherlands. You will need to arrange health insurance yourself.

Were you registered with us as a co-insured party under your partner’s policy and are you not receiving a surviving dependant’s pension? In that case your treaty entitlement ends. You will need to enquire at the health insurance fund in your country of residence about the insurance you can take out there.

Are you receiving a benefit under the life-course savings scheme before taking normal or early retirement? In that case you are not entitled to Dutch-funded medical care in your country of residence. You also cannot retain your health insurance in the Netherlands.

That means you need to arrange health insurance yourself in your country of residence. However, as soon as you start receiving a statutory pension, you are entitled to an S1/121. You can apply to us for this using the S1/121 application form (7.12.2020, PDF, 758 kB).

Were you self-employed (e.g. as a doctor, specialist or notary) and are you receiving a benefit under an early retirement scheme? If so, you are not entitled to an S1/121.

You will need to arrange health insurance yourself until you receive your old-age pension.

If you have made your own pension provisions and are receiving an annuity, you are not entitled to the form in question. You will need to arrange health insurance yourself until you receive your old-age pension.

EHIC from the CAK

EHIC stands for European Health Insurance Card. This card is issued free of charge. An EHIC entitles you to medical care if you fall ill while on holiday in Europe (outside your country of residence).

The EHIC is valid in EU countries and in Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland. You will receive care in accordance with the rules that apply in the country you are visiting. That means that healthcare providers will treat you in the same way as people who are compulsorily insured in that country.

Read more on the EHIC from the CAK

If you live in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland and are receiving a pension or benefit from the Netherlands, and you are also registered with the CAK, you can apply to us for an EHIC for yourself and any family members included under your policy.

Do you work in the Netherlands and do your co-insured family members live in another EU/EEA country or Switzerland? In that case you can apply to us for an EHIC for your co-insured family members. Apply for an EHIC for yourself from your Dutch health insurer.

Apply for an EHIC from the CAK

You can apply for an EHIC from the date on which your treaty entitlement becomes effective. You will find that date in the letter we sent you. If you apply for the EHIC too early, we will unfortunately be unable to process your application.

Read more on applying online for an EHIC

You apply for an EHIC using the online application form.

Are you applying for an EHIC for the first time? If so, find out first whether you are entitled to an EHIC. Have you previously applied for an EHIC? In that case you can apply for an EHIC directly.

How does the application for an EHIC work?

  1. You complete the application form.
  2. You receive confirmation of receipt by email.
  3. We process your application.
  4. We contact you if there is a problem while processing it.
  5. We keep you informed about the progress of your application by email.
  6. We send out your EHIC by post within 7 working days.

You can start using your EHIC as soon as you receive it. The expiry date is indicated on the EHIC.

Have you not received your EHIC or have you lost it?

Please contact us on the telephone number +31 88 711 5551.

You can receive necessary medical care in the country you are visiting on holiday, but only if it is an EU/EEA country or Switzerland. You will receive that care in accordance with the rules that apply in the country you are visiting.

On the European Commission website you can find out what medical care is refunded in each country. You will also find information on what you need to do to obtain a refund.

Please note: Are you travelling to another EU country specifically for medical treatment? If so, you cannot use your EHIC. In such a case you need to ask the health insurance fund in your country of residence for permission first.

Care received in private clinics is generally not refunded. Such care is often not included in a country’s statutory insurance package. That is the case in Spain, for example. Care in a private clinic does not form part of the care package there. In such a case you will receive an invoice that you will have to pay yourself. The same applies to medical care on a cruise ship, for example. Those private healthcare providers (clinics or doctors) will not accept the EHIC as a means of paying for your care. The CAK is also unable to refund those costs to you retrospectively. You therefore have to cover the entire cost yourself.

Read more on personal contribution for care abroad

Do you live in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland? If so, you are entitled to medical care in the Netherlands. You do not need to request permission. That means you can also come to the Netherlands specifically to receive treatment. In the Netherlands you can use the EHIC that you received from us.

Do you not yet have an EHIC? In that case you can apply for one.

Read more on using an EHIC in the Netherlands

Do you have an EHIC but still had to pay a doctor or pharmacy directly in cash? In such a case you can still claim back the costs from us. Use the form Declaration costs of medical care of a treaty-entitled person (13.9.2017, PDF, 87 kB).

Read more on cost declaration

Financial information for treaty-entitled persons

By 30 September of each year you will receive an annual statement for the previous year. The CAK has an obligation to provide this.

Has the Tax and Customs Administration notified us of the level of your worldwide income (Belastingdienst.nl)? If so, you will receive a final annual statement. This annual statement is based on your worldwide income. We will also apply the tax credits that you have applied for.

If we do not have any information about your worldwide income, you will receive a provisional annual statement first.

More information about your final annual statement

You must always settle your annual statement within 6 weeks.

This period starts from the date indicated on your final annual statement.

By 30 September of each year you will receive an annual statement for the previous year. The CAK has an obligation to provide this.

If we have not yet received your worldwide income from the Tax and Customs Administration, you will receive a provisional annual statement. We base this on the information relating to your Dutch income. No deductible items are taken into account in that case and we also do not yet apply all tax credits.

More information about a provisional annual statement

There is no limitation period for settling contributions. It is possible that you were already treaty-entitled in previous years, but did not receive an annual statement for those years.

You should therefore expect to receive an annual statement for any earlier years from us as well. If you have overpaid, we will refund the amount you are owed. If you have underpaid, you will need to make an additional payment. However, in most cases you can enter into a payment arrangement.

You have received an annual statement because your family member was registered with us as a treaty-entitled person. If your family member has died, we send the annual statement(s) to his or her heirs. The statement contains a summary of the healthcare contributions that your family member paid to us and should have paid.

There are three possible scenarios:

  1. Your family member paid the contribution in full.
  2. Your family member overpaid for that year; the heirs then receive a refund.
  3. Your family member underpaid for that year; the heirs then have to make an additional payment.

Read more on the annual statement for a deceased family member

We will transfer the amount to you as quickly as possible and within 6 weeks at the most. We can only do that if we have your bank account number.

Have you not yet given us your bank account number? In that case complete the form Notification of bank details of a treaty-entitled person (7.12.2020, PDF,  464 kB), sign it and return it to us. As soon as we have processed your details we will transfer the amount to you.

There may be various reasons why you have underpaid your contribution. The most common reasons for a high annual statement are explained below.

Read more on reasons why you have underpaid your contribution

Yes, you can. If you have received a final annual statement and there is an additional payment to make, you can enter into an arrangement with us.

A payment arrangement can be entered into for a maximum period of 12 or 24 months. This depends on the amount you have to pay us.

When can I apply for a payment arrangement?

You can apply for a payment arrangement if you have received a final annual statement and there is an additional payment to make. A payment arrangement is entered into for a maximum period of 12 or 24 months. Which period applies to you depends on the amount you have to pay:

  • EUR 100 to EUR 600: you can enter into a payment arrangement for between 2 and a maximum of 12 months. The minimum instalment is EUR 50.
  • EUR 600 to EUR 2 400: you can enter into a payment arrangement for a maximum of 12 months.
  • More than EUR 2 400: you can enter into a payment arrangement for a maximum of 24 months.
  • In some cases we can depart from these periods.
  • Do you have a Dutch, German, Belgian, French, Portuguese or Spanish bank account? If so, it is best to set up a direct debit. You can then be sure that your instalment will be paid on time. Make sure you have a sufficient balance to cover the transfer.

How do I apply for a payment arrangement?

Call us on +31 88 711 5551.

You must always settle your annual statement within 6 weeks. It is possible to enter into a payment arrangement with us. In that case different payment periods apply. If you do not have a payment arrangement and do not pay within 6 weeks, we will send you a reminder. You will then have a further 2 weeks to make the payment. If you still do not pay, we will send a payment demand. That is the last opportunity to settle the annual statement. You are given 2 weeks in which to do this.

If you have still not paid after receiving the reminder and the demand, we will engage a bailiff. The amount you have to pay is then increased, as you also have to pay the bailiff’s collection costs.

I am genuinely unable to pay

In some cases the bailiff informs us that at the present time you are genuinely unable to pay. We will then suspend the collection process temporarily. The bailiff will check once a year to see whether you are able to pay at a later point in time. If you can, the collection process will be restarted.

If you work in the Netherlands, you can receive help in the Netherlands with the settlement of your debts. This is referred to as the Amicable Debt Management Scheme for Natural Persons (Minnelijke Schuldsanering Natuurlijke Personen, MSNP). If the debt counsellor is affiliated to the Dutch Association of Municipal Money-Lending and Debt Counselling Institutions (NVVK), we will cancel a portion of your outstanding debt. This will be the amount remaining after we have received money via the debt assistance organisation.

Are you receiving assistance with the settlement of your debts in your country of residence? If so, we will assess your situation separately. This is because participation in a statutory debt management scheme differs from one treaty country to another.

The costs of healthcare abroad are often lower than they are in the Netherlands. One country may have a more extensive statutory care package than another. In some cases that means that healthcare is more expensive in that country, but generally the healthcare in your country of residence is cheaper. We refer to the ratio between the costs in the two countries as the country of residence factor.

We use the country of residence factor to adjust your healthcare contribution according to the level of healthcare in your country of residence. The Minister for Health, Welfare and Sport determines the country of residence factor annually for the treaty countries. If healthcare in your country of residence becomes more expensive, the country of residence factor also increases. You then have to pay a higher contribution.

Read more on country of residence factors

Do you live in a treaty country and do you pay an income-dependent contribution under the Long-Term Care Act (Wlz)? In that case you may be entitled to a number of tax credits. This will reduce your Wlz contribution, although it can never drop below EUR 0.

We process the following tax credits automatically:

  • general tax credit
  • elderly person’s tax credit
  • single elderly person’s tax credit
  • general tax credit for a partner with no income who is included under your policy and registered with us.

Find out more about which tax credits you can apply for

 

There are a number of tax credits that we do not process automatically. However, you can ask us to apply these to your contribution retrospectively. We will then deduct the credit from your income-dependent Wlz contribution. You can ask us to apply the following credits:

  • Tax credit for social investments and/or direct investments in venture capital and cultural investments.
  • General tax credit for a partner with no or low income.

Find out more about lodging an objection

A special tax credit is available if your partner earns no or very little income. In some cases we apply this tax credit automatically and sometimes you will have to apply for it.

Read more on this extra tax credit

Working or studying abroad

The Netherlands has various treaties with other countries. However, we only have agreements with the following countries relating to medical care in the event of emigration:

  • EU countries
  • EEA countries
  • treaty countries outside the EU/EEA

We refer to these countries as ‘treaty countries’.

Read on for an overview of treaty countries

If you undertake a traineeship abroad, you cannot always remain insured in the Netherlands. This depends on the country you go to and whether you are paid for your traineeship. Please therefore always contact the Sociale Verzekeringsbank (SVB.nl/en). Ask them whether you will remain insured under the Long-Term Care Act (Wlz).

Read more on health insurance and traineeship abroad

In most cases you will not remain insured in the Netherlands. If you are not sure, please contact the Sociale Verzekeringsbank (SVB.nl/en). The SVB will determine whether you will remain insured under the Long-Term Care Act (Wlz).

Read more on your health insurance

That depends on a number of factors. In many cases you are obliged to retain your Dutch health insurance.

See which situation applies to you

In that case you are still obliged to have health insurance in the Netherlands. You remain entitled to care in accordance with the terms and conditions of your Dutch health insurance policy. Ask your health insurer about the cover available abroad under your health insurance policy. Take out supplementary insurance if necessary. You may not stop your health insurance, even if you are insured via the university in your country of study.

Read more on health care while studying abroad

How that affects your health insurance depends on where you will be studying and working. Will you be in a treaty country or not and will you remain insured or not under the Wlz? See which situations apply to you below.

Read more on study or word abroad and how this affects your health insurance

If you go to work abroad, you can usually no longer be insured in the Netherlands. In some cases, however, you need to retain your health insurance. That is the case if you remain insured in the Netherlands under the Long-Term Care Act (Wlz). This will be assessed by the Sociale Verzekeringsbank (SVB).

Do you want to know if you will remain insured under the Wlz in the Netherlands? Then contact the SVB.

Read more on Wlz-insurance

Check carefully which situations apply to you below. Whether or not you are working in a treaty country and whether or not you will remain insured under the Wlz affects where you can (or need to) be insured, for example.

Read more on living in the Netherlands and working abroad

Yes, unless you are no longer insured under the Wlz. In that case you have to cancel your Dutch health insurance. See which situations apply to you below.

Read more on healt insurance while being posted abroad

If you live and work abroad, you will remain insured in the Netherlands. This does not always apply to the family members who live with you. That depends on the country to which you were sent.

See which situations apply to you

If you live and work abroad, you remain compulsorily insured in the Netherlands. That is not always the case for any family members living with you. It depends on the country to which you have been posted. See which situation applies to you below.

Read more on your family member's insurance

Are you planning to live, work, study or run a business across the border in Belgium, Germany or the Netherlands? If so, you will come up against rules and obligations that you will have to comply with in that country. That may have consequences for your health insurance, tax and any pension or benefit you receive.

Visit the website Grensinfopunt (Cross-Border Information Point, only availabe in Dutch and German)) to find out what that means for you personally, what arrangements you need to make and other practical information. Or check Netherlandsworldwide.nl.

Reporting the death of a treaty-entitled person

Did your family member (or client) pay a healthcare contribution for themselves and/or family members? Then the health insurance fund in the country of residence (or SVB or UWV) will notify the CAK accordingly. Registration with the health insurance fund ceases at the time of death. The CAK therefore stops collecting the healthcare contribution.

You can also report the death of your family member (or client) directly to us. To do so, use the secure contact form on this website. Do you have a death certificate? Then include this as an attachment. Read how to complete the contact form

You can also send the ‘death certificate’ by post. If you use our address label, a stamp is not required.

Please note

Were you, as a family member, co-insured with the deceased person? In that case, your healthcare insurance via the CAK will end at the time the principal insured person dies. Do you have any questions? Call us on +31 88 711 5551. Our staff will be happy to help you.

  1. Go to the online contact form.
  2. Under ‘Which scheme is involved?’, choose ‘Health insurance and abroad’.
  3. Please enter the following details in the message field:
    • your first name and surname (or those of the family’s contact person)
    • your or the contact person’s telephone number
    • your or the contact person’s email address
    • your or the contact person’s postal address
  4. Under ‘Add attachment’, click the pink box with the arrow. Find the death certificate (.pdf or .jpg) on your computer and add the certificate.
  5. In the next block enter:
    • the deceased person’s initials
    • the deceased person’s surname
    • NB Your own email address
    • your own telephone number
  6. In the last block enter:
    • Under ‘CAK reference’, the deceased person's ID insurance number. You will find this on all the letters we have sent to the client;
    • Under ‘Date of birth’, the deceased person's date of birth.

 

  • We will process your notification and add the death certificate to the client file.
  • As soon as we have received the obituary notice, we will send you (the heirs) a letter.
  • The letter will describe what happens next and, if necessary, we will ask you for additional information.
  • We will also ask the health insurance fund in the country of residence to confirm that the client has been deregistered there.

In the calendar year following the (year of) death of our client, we will draw up an annual statement. This states how much the client has paid in healthcare contributions. We will send this annual statement to the heirs.

Has our client paid too much and are you an heir?

Then we will ask you for proof that you are an heir and what your bank details are. But you will read that in the letter we are sending you. We may also ask for this information with the annual statement.

Has our client paid too little and are you an heir?

Then we will ask you (or the joint heirs) to pay the outstanding amount.

You are not an heir?

Then we will investigate whether the deceased client has heirs and who they are.

When will the annual statement come and will it be final?

We first need to know the world income of the deceased person in the year of death. We will receive this information from the Tax and Customs Administration in the Netherlands. In case we have not received this information yet, you will first receive a provisional annual statement.

It may also be the case that old annual statements are still open. These claims will be transferred to the heirs.

Are you an heir but wish to reject the inheritance? Please contact us on +31 88 711 5551. Our staff will discuss with you what the best thing is for you to do.

We are available on weekdays from 8.30 to 17.00.

Forms for treaty-entitled persons

If you move to a treaty country and are receiving a pension or benefit from the Netherlands, you can fill out the form Application for a document S1/form 121 (7.12.2020, PDF, 758 kB). On the basis of your application we will assess whether you are entitled to Dutch-funded medical care. If you are entitled to such care, we will send you the S1/121. This form allows you to register with a health insurance fund or company in your country of residence. Only after registration can you use medical care in your country of residence.

Please note

Are you moving to Spain? You will need, among other things, a NIE number (evidence that you are an EU citizen, in Spanish only) to register with a Spanish health insurance company. Take into account long waiting times. Please inform the Spanish consulate (in Spanish and Dutch only) in advance of any more documents you need when emigrating and make appointments online.

If your family members no longer live or work in the Netherlands, they can no longer have Dutch health insurance. In some cases they can be co-insured under your policy in their country of residence. That is only possible, however, if they live in a treaty country.

Do your family members live in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland?

  • Apply to the CAK for an S1 for your family members.
  • You need to request a separate document for each of them.

The following form can be used for your family members: Application for a document S1 for a family member (7.12.2020, PDF, 547 kB).

Read more on family members living in another European country

Do you have an EHIC but have still had to pay a doctor or pharmacy directly in cash? In such a case you can still claim back the costs from us. Use the form Declaration, costs of medical care for treaty-entitled persons (7.12.2020, PDF, 601 kB).

You can use the form Notification of bank details of a treaty-entitled person (7.12.2020, PDF, 464 kB) to let us know your bank account number.

Would you like your contribution to be debited automatically every month? If so, please contact us to authorise us to collect it in this way.

Do you disagree with a decision of the CAK? If so, contact us by telephone and we will try to find a solution together with you.

You can also lodge an objection. There are two ways to do this:

Print out the objection form

Print out the form Lodging an objection (7.12.2020, PDF, 1002 kB) and fill it in.

Please enclose the following documents:

  • a copy of the decision against which you are objecting
  • copies of any supporting documents
  • if someone else is lodging an objection on your behalf: an authorisation (7.12.2020, PDF, 566 kB)

Send a letter

Would you prefer to send us a letter? In that case include the following information in the objection letter you send:

  • your name, address and email address
  • the date on which you are sending the objection letter
  • a description of the decision against which you are objecting (quote the date and decision number)
  • the reason why you disagree with the decision
  • your citizen service number (BSN)
  • your telephone number

Please enclose the following documents:

  • a copy of the decision against which you are objecting
  • copies of any supporting documents
  • if someone else is lodging an objection on your behalf: an authorisation (7.12.2020, PDF, 566 kB)

Sign the objection letter and send it to:

CAK

Afdeling Bezwaar & Beroep

Antwoordnummer 1608

2509 VB The Hague

No stamp is needed.

Please note

Are you writing to us from abroad? In that case please use the following address:

CAK

Afdeling Bezwaar & Beroep

Postbus 84030

2508 AA The Hague

Find out more about how we handle an objection

Are you unhappy with the service we have provided? If so, contact us by telephone and we will try to find a solution together with you.

You can also fill in a complaint form or send us a letter.

Complaint form

Fill in the online Zvw complaint form. Please indicate clearly that you are making a complaint and provide your address details and a telephone number that we can use to contact you.

Send a letter

Would you prefer to send us a letter? Please include the following information:

  • Your name
  • Your address
  • Your date of birth
  • The date on which you are sending the complaint
  • What your complaint is about
  • Your citizen service number (BSN)
  • Your telephone number, so we can call you to discuss the matter personally

Send your complaint to:

CAK

Antwoordnummer 1608

2509 VB The Hague

No stamp is needed.

Please note

Are you writing to us from abroad? In that case please use the following address:

CAK

Afdeling Bezwaar & Beroep

Postbus 84030

2508 AA The Hague

Find out more about how we handle a complaint

Do you have a question and are you unable to find an answer on our website? Or do you have a request? If so, you can use the contact form to send us a message.

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