Pensioners and beneficiaries

You have a pension or benefit from the Netherlands and you are moving abroad. Or maybe you already live there and you will soon receive a Dutch pension. This might affect your health insurance. When you live in or move to a treaty country you are probably entitled to medical care at the expense of the Netherlands. You then need to register with the CAK.

Register with the CAK

‚ÄčIf you emigrate, your Dutch health insurance will end. Do you still have a statutory pension or a benefit from the Netherlands? And are you moving to or living in a treaty country? You will then have to take out health insurance via the CAK. You're legally obliged to do that. So you don't have the choice to arrange a health insurance yourself. Your country of residence settles the healthcare costs with the Netherlands. You pay a healthcare contribution (a kind of premium) to us.

More information?

Please check the following first:  There are 3 possibilities:
  1. You live in or move to a country that is not a treaty country. Take out health insurance for yourself and moving family members in the country where you are going to live. You have nothing to do with the CAK.
  2. You live in or move to a treaty country, but you do not receive a statutory pension or benefit from the Netherlands (yet). Take out health insurance for yourself and moving family members in the country where you are going to live. You have nothing to do with the CAK (yet).
  3. You live in or move to a treaty country. And you receive a statutory pension or benefit from the Netherlands. Register with the CAK

Do you live in a treaty country? And are you receiving a statutory pension or statutory benefit from the Netherlands? If so, you need to apply for a document S1/form 121 from us. With the S1/121 you register with a healthcare fund in your country of residence. Only after registration you can use medical care in your country of residence. 

Tip

Are you planning to emigrate to a treaty country? Find more information at I am moving abroad.

On the website Netherlandsworldwide of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs you'll read what else you need to know besides health insurance.

This depends on their situation:

  • Are they receiving a statutory Dutch pension or benefit themselves? If so, they also have to apply for a document S1/form 121.
  • Are they not receiving a Dutch pension, benefit or other income themselves? It may be possible to co-insure them. The health insurance fund in your country of residence will decide about this and will notify us. Are you living in the EU/EEA, Switzerland or United Kingdom? Then you can register your family members on your S1/121 application form. Are you living in another treaty country? In that case you will need to register your family members with the health insurance fund in your country of residence yourself.
  • Do your family members still work in the Netherlands? If so, compulsory health insurance continues to apply and they must retain their Dutch health insurance. They will need an S1/106 to register with a health insurance fund in your country of residence. They can apply for this document from their Dutch health insurer.

Entitlement to healthcare

You are entitled to medical care according to the laws in your country of residence. You can ask the health insurance fund where you register, which treatments and medicines will be reimbursed. You can claim costs incurred in your country of residence from the health insurance fund in your country of residence. You cannot claim those costs from us. 

Lees hoe u zorg in uw woonland krijgt

Whether you receive healthcare in another country depends on your situation. If so, note that this only applies to medically necessary care.

You live in an EU/EEA country, Switzerland or the United Kingdom

Do you need medically necessary care while staying in another EU/EEA country, Switzerland or the United Kingdom? If so, use your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). You can apply for an EHIC online. You cannot use the EHIC in your country of residence. There you use the local health insurance card. To cover healthcare during your holiday in countries outside the EU/EEA, Switzerland or the United Kingdom, you need to take out additional insurance or travel insurance.

You live in another treaty country

If you do not live in an EU/EEA country, Switzerland or the United Kingdom, you are not entitled to an EHIC. To cover medical expenses when staying in other countries, it is useful to take out additional insurance or travel insurance.

When do I need permission?

Do you want to go to another country especially for medical treatment? Or would you like to buy medicines in another country? You first need to permission from the healthcare insurance fund in your country of residence. If you don't have permission (yet), you run the risk of having to pay the costs yourself.

More information?

Read more on I want to go abroad for medical treatment

Do you live in an EU/EEA country, Switzerland or the United Kingdom? Then you are entitled to medical care in the Netherlands. This includes not only medically neccesary care but all care included in the Dutch basic health insurance package. You can show the healthcare provider the EHIC you have received from us. Don't you have an EHIC yet? Then apply for an EHIC online.

When am I not entitled to healthcare in the Netherlands?

Do you live in a country that is not a EU/EEA country, Switzerland or the United Kingdom? In that case you are not entitled to an EHIC. That means you cannot use an EHIC to receive medical care in the Netherlands. You will need to take out extra insurance or travel insurance to cover medical costs incurred during your stay in the Netherlands.

More information?

Read more on I want to go to the Netherlands for medical treatment

Or visit Retirees and beneficiaries at Zilveren Kruis to see what kind of healthcare is refunded and what steps you need to take to get a refund. 

Financial information

Every month we have a healthcare contribution deducted to your pension(s) or benefit. Each year you will receive an annual account for the previous year before 30 September. In this you'll read whether you have paid too much, too little or exactly enough.

Read the FAQs about the annual statement

Would you like to know more about the healthcare contribution? Or about the healthcare benefit?

Read the FAQs about financial matters

Frequently asked questions

You can find here an overview of statutory pensions and benefits in the Netherlands. If you receive one of these pensions or benefits and live in a treaty country, register with the CAK as a treaty-entitled person.
 

See which pensions and benefits qualify

The Netherlands has various treaties with other countries. However, we only have agreements with the following countries relating to medical care in the event of emigration:

  • EU/EEA countries plus Switzerland and the United Kingdom
  • a few countries outside the EU/EEA

We refer to these countries as ‘treaty countries’.

See all treaty countries

You pay a healthcare contribution for the right to medical care in your country of residence. Your country of residence settles your healthcare costs with the Netherlands. This has been agreed with a number of countries. Therefore, you do not pay a health premium to the local health insurance company for basic care in your country of residence. Instead, you pay a healthcare contribution to the Netherlands.

Please note

The information is for pensioners and beneficiaries only. For information on the healthcare contribution for family members of employees, please check this page.
 

Read more on the healthcare contribution

The costs of healthcare abroad are often lower than they are in the Netherlands. One country may have a more extensive statutory healthcare package than another. In some cases that means that healthcare is more expensive in that country, but generally the healthcare in your country of residence is cheaper. We refer to the ratio between the costs in the two countries as the country of residence factor.

We use the country of residence factor to adjust your healthcare contribution according to the size and costs of healthcare package in your country of residence (country of residence package). The Minister for Health, Welfare and Sport determines the country of residence factor annually for the treaty countries. If healthcare in your country of residence becomes more expensive, the country of residence factor also increases. You then have to pay a higher healthcare contribution.

Read more on the country of residence factor

A country of residence package is a package of healthcare facilities and services you and your co-insured family members are entitled to in your country of residence. By healthcare services, we mean, for example, costs of the general practicioner, medicines and hospitalisations. Each country has a different country of residence package.

Healthcare services

The coverage of the country of residence package is the same as the statutory healthcare package in that country. In the Netherlands, for example, this is the basic health insurance. You are therefore entitled to reimbursement of the same healthcare as other residents of that country. You also have the same duties: if your country of residence has an own risk or contribution, the same applies to you.

Visit Netherlandsworldwide.nl and see what you need to consider, in addition to health insurance, when you are going to live, work or travel abroad.

Has your relative passed away? We are sorry for your loss. Did your deceased relative pay a healthcare contribution for himself and/or family members? Then the health insurance fund in the country of residence or the SVB/UWV will report this to to us. We will then stop collecting the healthcare contribution from the date of death.

Read more

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